JT_blog.jpg

Heat sinks for welding: keep your cool

 

“I can’t possibly assemble this product with a weld.  It’s too sensitive to heat.”

Really???  Tell me more.  This is probably not the problem you think it is.

Read More

We're playing music with lasers for the 4th of July

It’s almost the Fourth of July, and before we all head out to celebrate with fireworks and barbecues, I thought we’d do something a little different to kick off our first video blog.  What’s the perfect song for Independence Day?  The “Star Spangled Banner” would be a pretty good choice, right?  Well, how about the “Star Spangled Banner” played by a high power industrial laser! Check out the video below:

Read More

Weld tolerance and "how big a gap can you weld?"

  

Oh boy.  I’m sure I’ll get flak from someone for tackling this one, but here goes anyway.

Let’s talk about tolerances for welding.  For this post, we’ll focus only on the weld joint and follow the common theme of customer-vendor interaction.

Customer: “What kind of gap range can you tolerate in a weld?”

Vendor: “What kind of weld?  Process? How deep? How wide? Material?  Filler?”

Customer: “That doesn’t matter yet, I just need to know how big of a gap you can weld and how much it can vary.”

Read More

Welding gaps and "Just weld it"

One of the most dreaded phrases we can hear on the welding job shop side is “Just weld it.”

This is a trap, no matter the good intentions behind it.  It's also a recipe for disappointment and hurt feelings. To avoid that disappointment and save some time, money, and aggravation on your welding project, let me explain.

Read More

New leadership series helps women advance their STEM careers (updated)

(This post has been updated to include revised dates and locations for the workshop sessions.)

If you’re a woman in STEM (science, technology, engineering, math), how do you navigate a career with few role models or mentors?

According to the U.S. Department of Commerce, women are 50 percent of the overall workforce but only 24 percent of the STEM workforce. Moreover, 50 percent of women in STEM careers drop out in the first 10 years.

Read More

10 benefits of laser welding

We’ve touched on some pretty heady stuff in the past couple of blogs, so maybe something more straightforward is in order.  Here goes:

Why use laser welding?

Read More

Contaminants in your weld? Here's how to prevent them

 

Sandwiches don't mix well with welding.

I mentioned in blog 4 that contamination is a topic in itself.  Well, why not follow that train of thought?

Anything and everything that is not the “stuff” being welded is a potential contaminant.  Whether it be oil from machining, paper fibers, soapy water from a wash cycle, a sliver of plastic from your expensive non-marring table top, or even brown mustard from that London broil sandwich you had for lunch, these are going to put something unexpected into your end product.

Read More

Common weld defects and their causes: porosity

Alright, now that you’ve read the “Misconceptions About Welding” blogs, you want to know what else you might not know about welding, huh?  So, let’s talk defects.  In this blog we’ll discuss porosity.

I like to talk about porosity more than other weld defects because even though there are many contributing factors to it, at the end of the day it is always (did I use an absolute?) trapped gas in the solidifying weld.

Read More

Welding Myths Part 3: A weld is never as strong as the parent material

To go along with the last post on welding myths and non-weldable materials, I also often get grudging calls from a designer who has been “forced” to add a weld to a design.

Customer: “How much do I have to overdesign this part for this weld?”

Me: “Why do you want to overdesign?”

Customer: “Well, the weld is going to weaken the part!  I need to beef it up to compensate.”

Read More

New leadership series helps women advance their STEM careers

If you’re a woman in STEM (science, technology, engineering, math), how do you navigate a career with few role models or mentors?

According to the U.S. Department of Commerce, women are 50 percent of the overall workforce but only 24 percent of the STEM workforce. Moreover, 50 percent of women in STEM careers drop out in the first 10 years.

Read More

Share This Post

   

Blog Comments